Monday, April 25, 2011

The Waterhole: Movie Review


Hilarious dialogue for drunk, angry, twenty-something guys.

In a non-descript small town, "The Waterhole" centers on Miller (Patrick J. Adams) as he frequents a bar with best friend and roommate, Jim (Jade Carter), and bar's owner Murphy (Matt Stasi). Although it's about a group of friends hanging out in a bar discussing life and navigating love and relationships, it's better written than that, making it better than most of its contemporaries.
2009 (With 2011 DVD release)

Directed by: Ely Mennin

Screenplay by: Nathan Cole

Starring: Patrick J. Adams

The dialogue is hilarious taking us from the funniest, most daring and insensitive break-up scene ever, through a refreshingly original marriage comparison, and to a highly comical, but not necessarily facetious, examination of rehab, and then back through it all again since the filmmakers had more to say. The characters didn't go as far, they were just angry, drunk twenty-somethings hanging out in a bar. But Patrick J. Adams plays drunk and angry just as well as he plays cute and handsome.

There were a number of trite and hackneyed moments, but that's going to be the case with most "college graduates trying to find themselves" films. But for a dialogue-driven film, the writing was great, especially for a first-time screenwriter. Nathan Cole is headed towards a career deserving of comparisons to Edward Burns, and I'm looking forward to seeing it develop.

"The Waterhole" is a great place to hang out for an hour and a half. Laugh at the asinine but realistic plights the guys get themselves into, laugh at the surprisingly insightful humour in the dialogue, and still enjoy yourself as it goes through the more dramatic, commonplace junctures.



Recommended:

Happythankyoumoreplease (2010) - Twenty-somethings negotiating relationships and who they are with some pretty good dialogue.

Cemetery Junction (2010) - The comedy and drama of three young men coming-of-age and desperately trying to escape their town.

High Fidelity (2000) - An hilarious potrayal of the romantic hopelessness from a man's point-of-view.